Tip submitted by builder Jim Streit [wooody98@bellsouth.net]

Initially I tried to drill the "AEX" wedge following Vans instructions of using a block of wood cut at a 84 degree angle (6 degrees of of perpendicular) and holding the drill bit parallel to the angle on the block.  the "AEX" strip is at an angle of 12 degrees and the drill bit would slide "down hill" and would elongate the hole in the top skin.  I thought there must be a better way, and this is what I came up with.
My procedure to drill the trailing edge wedge strips.
I used this procedure for the trailing edges on all of the control surfaces, the rudder, elevator, ailerons and flaps.  It has give me excellent repeatable results.

1st.
I clamp the strip to the underside of the upper skin which has the holes pre punched in it.  I use a sharpie pen to carefully mark the location of each hole on the strip.  I do this before the skin is riveted to the ribs or stiffeners while the skin is still nice and flat.

2nd.
Next I carefully align and clamp my jig to the drill press table using the "12 degree track" which puts the wedge perpendicular to the drill bit to keep the drill bit from sliding.   This ensures that all of the holes are exactly the same distance from the trailing edge.  I start with the drill bit centered on the sharpie dot and drill just enough to start a hole equal to the diameter of the drill (#40)  By carefully aligning the drill with the sharpie dots will ensure that the holes in the strip are exactly in line with the holes in the skin

3rd.
After making a starter hole at each location, I turn the jig around and use the "6 degree track" which causes the hole to be drilled perpendicular to the chord of the strip, and drill through the strip.  After drill all of the holes, I use my deburring tool to clean up the holes in the strip.  I then  clecko the strip to the skin to check for alignment of the drilled holes.

4th.
Next, after adjusting the depth of my microstop countersink, I re-align the jig using the "middle track" which is carefully cut at 12 degrees and at a depth to put the top of the strip exactly even with the top surface (wood) of the jig, giving the countersink a resting place, with the base of the microstop part on the strip and part on the wooden jig so that the countersinks are perpendicular to the surface of the strip.  When I started to countersink the second side of the strip I was concerned the the countersink would "wonder" since the hole in the strip was now bigger that the #40 pilot on the countersink, but it turned out to center itself in the enlarged hole and the countersink came out perfect.

5th.
My next dilemma was how to buck the rivets when riveting the trailing edge.  I solved that by buying a 7' long piece of 1/4" angle iron, 2" on a side and bolting it to the top edge of my bench so that it was exactly in line with the top of the bench.  I put the control surface on the bench with the trailing edge on the angle iron and clamped it with stiff spring clamps at 6" intervals.  I tried AN426AD3.5 rivets but because I had epoxy primed the skins and strips, I did not get the the proper shop head so used a 4.0 rivet and the heads came out very good.
 
 

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Here is the jig I made for drilling the wedge strips.

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12 degree track on left, 6 degree track on right and 12 degree flush track in the middle

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using 12 degree track to drill starter hole

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using 6 degree track for through hole

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middle track for machine countersinking

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aligning angle iron to top of work bench

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clamping trailing edge skin to angle iron (Mike's Note: I love the rivet gun & drill holders!!)

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Final results, Mfg'd head

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Final results, shop head

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The proof is in the puddin, straight as an arrow....

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I hope that my idea will be of use to others that are coming along after me.  I am enjoying the building process very much and with the tail feathers finished and now the flap and ailerons done, I am looking forward to getting started on the wings